5 Questions You Should Be Asking Your Dentist

Here Are 5 Questions You Should Be Asking Your Dentist

A routine visit to the dentist is not only good for your teeth, but it could help you live longer. Even if you have never previously had a cavity or major dental issue, you should still visit your local dental office for a cleaning and general checkup at least twice per year or more. Your dentist is your first line of defense and can make sure there are no telling signs of health problems such as cancer and diabetes.

Here are 5 questions you should be asking your dentist during your next appointment: 5 Questions You Should Be Asking Your Dentist Image

  • What are these canker sores on my cheeks and should I be concerned? If you have any bumps or sores on the inside of your mouth, be sure to ask the dental hygienist to check them out. Chances are they will recommend you to gargle with mouthwash or hydrogen peroxide and water mixture daily to alleviate these sores and to fight any possible infections. But, if the sore is characterized as a lesion, you should request an oral cancer screening from an experienced dental care provider.
  • Why do my gums bleed when I floss or brush? Now that most dentists use electronic tools to clean teeth instead of hand-scraping, sometimes bleeding gums can go unnoticed. If your teeth bleed every time you floss, that may be a sign of inflammation of the gums that can lead to infection. If bleeding gums goes untreated, the infection could affect other parts of your body.
  • What is the best toothpaste for me? It’s no secret that teeth bleaching services are a popular request for dental offices, especially in Beverly Hills, but many people fear that over-the-counter whitening toothpastes are too abrasive and can damage the important enamel from our teeth. It is always a good idea to ask your dentist what he or she recommends, because everyone has an opinion on how to choose the right toothpaste–It can’t hurt to hear what is recommended for your situation.
  • I brush often and floss daily, why do I still get cavities? Unfortunately, some people are more prone to cavities than others. Some say it’s due to vitamin and mineral deficiencies from our modern diets while others think it’s a hereditary trait passed from the parent to child. No matter what your situation is, I believe a health diet and good oral hygiene can go a long way.
  • Does my medication affect my dental visit? It could, especially if you are having teeth pulled or something that causes bleeding. Even something that seems insignificant, such as Aspirin, can make things difficult. Be sure to tell your dentist about anything you are taking, even natural supplements.

Chances are you see your dentist more than your healthcare provider, so if you have a general health concern, talk to your dentist about it to see whether it relates to your oral health. For more information about cosmetic dentistry, please visit Arthur Glosman dds

 

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